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dc.contributor.authorKilroy, Gerard
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Roger K.
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Michael T.
dc.date01/01/2017
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-10T17:42:50Z
dc.date.available2018-10-10T17:42:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationKilroy, Gerard, Roger K. Smith, and Michael T. Montgomery. "A unified view of tropical cyclogenesis and intensification." Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society 143.702 (2017): 450-462.
dc.identifier.otherDTIC Id 126605
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/60222
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.2934en_US
dc.description.abstractIdealized high-resolution numerical simulations of tropical cyclogenesis are presented in a model that represents deep convection by a warm rain process only. Starting with an initially weak, cloud-free, axisymmetric warm-cored vortex (maximum wind speed 5 m s−1 at a radius of 100 km), rapid vortex intensification begins after a gestation period on the order of 2 days. From a three-dimensional perspective, the genesis process is similar to that in the rotating convection paradigm for vortex intensification starting with a much stronger initial vortex (Vmax = 15 m s−1). The patterns of deep convection and convectively amplified cyclonic relative vorticity are far from axisymmetric during the genesis period. Moreover, the organization of the cyclonic relative vorticity into a monopole structure occurs at relatively low wind speeds, before the maximum local wind speed has increased appreciably. Barotropic processes are shown to play an important role in helping to consolidate a single-signed vorticity monopole within a few hours near the intensification begin time. The rotating convection paradigm appears adequate to explain the basic genesis process within the weak initial vortex, providing strong support for a hypothesis of Montgomery and Smith that the genesis process is not fundamentally different from that of vortex intensification. In particular, genesis does not require a ‘trigger’ and does not depend on the prior existence of a mid-level vortex.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Research Global
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation
dc.description.sponsorshipNOAA HFIP
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Aeronautics and Space Administration
dc.description.sponsorshipNaval Postgraduate School
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherWiley
dc.titleA unified view of tropical cyclogenesis and intensification: Tropical Cyclogenesisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorology
dc.subject.authortropical cycloneen_US
dc.subject.authorhurricaneen_US
dc.subject.authortyphoonen_US
dc.subject.authorspin-upen_US
dc.subject.authorcyclogenesisen_US
dc.subject.authorintensificationen_US
dc.description.funderMTM acknowledges the support of NSF grant AGS-1313948, NOAA HFIP grant N0017315WR00048, NASA grant NNG11PK021


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