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dc.contributor.advisorShattuck, Nita L.
dc.contributor.advisorHeissel, Jennifer A.
dc.contributor.authorCombs, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-26T19:21:09Z
dc.date.available2018-10-26T19:21:09Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/60379
dc.descriptionApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigated the changes in physiological and cognitive performance as F-22 pilots transitioned short term to night-flying weeks using salivary markers of stress, cortisol and alpha amylase, wrist activity monitors, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX), and a go/no-go (GNG) developed by Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton. Seventeen fully qualified F-22 pilots took part in the two-week study. We found no differences in GNG reaction time or accuracy, NASA-TLX scores, or sleep quantity as participants transitioned to night-flying weeks. Sample cortisol levels were significantly higher than civilian levels in all experimental conditions and control days. Researchers fitted a unique participant cortisol curve and found higher-than-predicted participant cortisol levels post-flight in the day-flying condition and lower-than-predicted participant levels post-flight in the night-flying condition. Two negative relationships, F-22 experience by the magnitude of cortisol change (pre- to post-flight) in the day-flying condition and age by Perceived Stress Survey scores, suggested stress adaptation in the F-22 community. We thought that the night-flying environment would be more stressful on the aviator. While more research is required to support the results found in this study, it appeared that day flying is more stressful.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/comparisonofphys1094560379
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCOMPARISON OF PHYSIOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE IN F-22 PILOTS DURING THE TRANSITION FROM DAY TO NIGHT FLYING OPERATIONSen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWhitaker, Lyn R.
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.subject.authorsalivaen_US
dc.subject.authorgo/no-goen_US
dc.subject.authorinhibitory testen_US
dc.subject.authorNASA-TLXen_US
dc.subject.authoractigraphyen_US
dc.subject.authorfatigueen_US
dc.subject.authorflyingen_US
dc.subject.authornight-flyingen_US
dc.subject.authorF-22en_US
dc.subject.authorshift worken_US
dc.subject.authorcortisolen_US
dc.subject.authoralpha amylaseen_US
dc.subject.authorstressen_US
dc.subject.authorreaction timeen_US
dc.subject.authoraccuracyen_US
dc.subject.authorPSSen_US
dc.subject.authorSRRSen_US
dc.subject.authorPSQIen_US
dc.subject.authorESSen_US
dc.subject.authorMEQ-SAen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Human Systems Integrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineHuman Systems Integrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid29776


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