Publication:
ENDING THE CYCLE: A HISTORY OF ROHINGYA PERSECUTION, ANALYSIS OF THEIR POTENTIAL FOR RADICALIZATION, AND A METHOD FOR ATTAINING A PEACEFUL RESOLUTION

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Authors
Knie, Curtis T.
Pride, Travis E.
Subjects
Rohingya
Myanmar
refugee
radicalization
forced migration
citizenship
Advisors
Gregg, Heather S.
Date of Issue
2018-09
Date
Sep-18
Publisher
Monterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
In August 2017, the forced mass migration of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority group in Myanmar, became world news after the country’s military began to drive thousands from their homes. Within months, an estimated 671,000 Rohingya had left the country, and today remain with over 200,000 previous refugees in overcrowded, underfunded camps in Bangladesh. This thesis aims to investigate the root causes of Rohingya persecution by the government and military of Myanmar, the likelihood that this population will become radicalized, and possible solutions to the crisis. It uses a mixed method approach to examine these questions, including a qualitative look at the history of the Rohingya; visual analytic techniques to evaluate the international response to the 2017 Rohingya refugee crisis; and a game theoretic approach to better understand the possibility of a nonviolence solution that focuses on citizenship and regional autonomy for the Rohingya. This thesis finds that the most recent wave of forced migration has placed the Rohingya at increased risk of radicalization and offers three recommendations for mitigating these risks: providing more international aid to sustain the refugees in Bangladesh; moving beyond simply repatriating the Rohingya; and creating incentives for Myanmar to recognize the Rohingya as citizens and give them greater autonomy in Rakhine State.
Type
Thesis
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Defense Analysis (DA)
Defense Analysis (DA)
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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