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dc.contributor.authorLim, See Yee
dc.contributor.authorMarzin, Charline
dc.contributor.authorXavier, Prince
dc.contributor.authorChang, Chih-Pei
dc.contributor.authorTimbal, Bertrand
dc.date1 June 2017
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-09T20:01:09Z
dc.date.available2019-01-09T20:01:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationLim, See Yee, et al. "Impacts of boreal winter monsoon cold surges and the interaction with MJO on Southeast Asia rainfall." Journal of Climate 30.11 (2017): 4267-4281.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/60902
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0546.1en_US
dc.description.abstractTRMM rainfall data from 1998–2012 are used to study the impacts and interactions of cold surges (CSs) and the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) on rainfall over Southeast Asia during the boreal winter season from November to February. CSs are identified using a new large-scale index. The frequencies of occurrences of these two large-scale events are comparable (about 20% of the days each), but the spatial pattern of impacts show differences resulting from the interactions of the general flow with the complex orography of the region. The largest impact of CSs occurs in and around the southern South China Sea as a result of increased low-level convergence on the windward side of the terrain and increased shear vorticity off Borneo that enhances the Borneo vortex. The largest impact of the MJO is in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean, sheltered from CSs by Sumatra. In general CSs are significantly more likely to trigger extreme rainfall. When both systems are present, the rainfall pattern is mainly controlled by the CSs. However, the MJO makes the environment more favorable for convection by moistening the atmosphere and facilitating conditional instability, resulting in a significant increased rainfall response compared to CSs alone. In addition to the interactions of the two systems in convection, this study confirms a previously identified mechanism in which theMJOmay reduce CS frequency through opposing dynamic structures.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCentre for Climate Research Singapore, Meteorological Service Singapore (MSS)
dc.description.sponsorshipWorld Meteorological Organization and the World Weather Research Programme
dc.format.extent15 p.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleImpacts of Boreal Winter Monsoon Cold Surges and the Interaction with MJO on Southeast Asia Rainfallen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorologyen_US
dc.subject.authorIntraseasonal variability
dc.subject.authorMadden-Julian oscillation
dc.subject.authorCold air surges
dc.subject.authorMonsoons
dc.subject.authorTropical variability
dc.description.funderGA01101


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