Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMatsangas, Panagiotis
dc.contributor.authorShattuck, Nita Lewis
dc.dateDecember 20, 2016
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-01T17:28:33Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01T17:28:33Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-20
dc.identifier.citationMatsangas, Panagiotis, and Nita Lewis Shattuck. "The Effect of Ship Department on Crew Sleep Patterns and Psychomotor Vigilance Performance." Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Vol. 59. No. 1. Sage CA: Los Angeles, CA: SAGE Publications, 2015.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/61128
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591184en_US
dc.descriptionProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting - 2015
dc.description.abstractU.S. Navy ship crews are organizationally divided into departments, i.e., functional groups with specific tasks and an officer in charge. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of ship departments on crew sleep patterns and psychomotor vigilance performance. Crewmembers (N=93) from an Arleigh Burke-type destroyer participated in a 16-day quasi-experimental study while the ship was forward deployed. Each sailor wore an actigraph, completed a daily activity log, and performed a 3-minute psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) before and after standing watch. Actigraphy results show that crewmembers were chronically sleep deprived, receiving on average 6.6 hours of daily sleep. Rest and sleep opportunities were varied significantly depending on the department to which the crewmember belongs. Specifically, the Operations department, followed by Engineering, had the worst sleep patterns as indicated by reduced and fragmented sleep. Using actigraphic recordings, approximately 22% of the participants occasionally napped during their night watch. Although not statistically significant due to its large variability, the pattern of PVT results agrees with the sleep analysis. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the department to which a crewmember belongs is a factor to be taken into account when assessing performance at sea. In our sample, results demonstrate that the two departments most affected are the Operations and the Engineering. Both of these departments have critical duties while underway, yet they experience the most sleep deprivation. Future efforts should strive to further quantify this phenomenon and to address methods to ameliorate the problem.en_US
dc.format.extent5 p.en_US
dc.publisherSage Journalsen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe Effect of Ship Department on Crew Sleep Patterns and Psychomotor Vigilance Performanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record