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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn C.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Casey T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T22:47:03Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T22:47:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/61257
dc.descriptionApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines multiple theories for why law enforcement officers misuse force. It explores decision-making theory that has been used to describe how officers make rapid decisions under stress. Biases can affect an officer’s ability or propensity to use force. Recognition Primed Decision addresses how over-emphasis on using force during training can prime officers to rely on force in the streets. Such other factors as the warrior mentality (versus the guardian mentality) that are instilled in recruits also may affect an officer’s readiness to use force; officers also are taught that their lives are a priority over others. And finally, the law enforcement community has a sense of immunity from being held legally responsible, reinforced by courts’ inability to prosecute officers or hold them liable. Practices and policies are examined in agencies that exacerbate or mitigate these issues. Over-emphasis on using force during training and specific material meant to foster the warrior mentality are identified as problems plaguing some departments. De-escalation training and training that mitigates officer bias are identified as important practices to implement. This thesis includes several recommendations that leaders should examine to minimize officer misuse of force.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/conflictmanageme1094561257
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleCONFLICT MANAGEMENT TRAINING AND NONLETHAL WEAPON USEen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderAnglemyer, Andrew T.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorlaw enforcementen_US
dc.subject.authorconflict management trainingen_US
dc.subject.authorcrisis managementen_US
dc.subject.authornonlethal weaponsen_US
dc.subject.authoruse of forceen_US
dc.subject.authorpolicingen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid30327


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