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dc.contributor.advisorEverton, Sean F.
dc.contributor.authorSadoun, Andrew A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T22:47:05Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T22:47:05Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/61259
dc.descriptionApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how Military Information Support Operations (MISO) organizations can leverage social networks to influence foreign target audiences. The paper acknowledges that some organizations and industries external to the defense community, like non-state actors and large businesses, routinely use social networks to project influence within certain population segments. The thesis uses four case studies to examine how non-state actors and business marketers leverage social networks to persuade target audiences and achieve goals. The case studies generate several inferences about how social networks could be leveraged within the MISO Community. First, the most influential information content does not come from within the MISO team. The best content emanates from a network of many indigenous influential actors close to or within a target audience. Because of this, MISO elements should focus more on becoming "network managers" rather than content developers. Second, to leverage these networks, MISO teams should identify, engage, and build mutually beneficial relationships within the influence network. This is a slow and gradual process based on mutual trust and thus takes years to complete.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/psyopandsocialne1094561259
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titlePSYOP AND SOCIAL NETWORKSen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderFreeman, Michael E.
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorMISOen_US
dc.subject.authorPSYOPen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial networksen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial network analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorCoca-Colaen_US
dc.subject.authorPepsien_US
dc.subject.authorCokeen_US
dc.subject.authorinformation operationsen_US
dc.subject.authormarketingen_US
dc.subject.authorinfluence operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorcase studyen_US
dc.subject.authorspecial operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorArmyen_US
dc.subject.authormilitaryen_US
dc.subject.authornetwork analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorNodeXLen_US
dc.subject.authorGephien_US
dc.subject.authorpsychological operationsen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary Information Support Operationsen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Information Strategy and Political Warfareen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Strategy and Political Warfareen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid32405


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