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dc.contributor.advisorHudgens, Bryan J.
dc.contributor.advisorHartmann, Latika
dc.contributor.authorAdame, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMarkling, Matthew R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T22:47:45Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T22:47:45Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/61307
dc.descriptionApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIn this project, we surveyed private industry supply chain managers and contracting professionals from the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center. The purpose was to ascertain knowledge and application of resource dependency and power-dependent relations theories within their respective organizations. A better understanding of the theories would allow organizations to position themselves strategically to secure supply bases for future requirements and to leverage strengths and minimize organizational weaknesses during negotiations. Despite survey respondents not knowing the terminology utilized within the theories tested, most respondents were capable of selecting the proper courses of actions, given either a resource dependency or power-dependent relations scenario-based question. This implies the organizations surveyed provide members some amount of training on the theoretical principles and can apply that knowledge to practical situations. Despite a shared theoretical knowledge between the public and private sectors, private sector respondents stated that they were more likely to utilize these principles and are postured to have a greater negotiating position. Public sector organizations who neglect these principles place themselves in a disadvantageous position when negotiating with or relying upon contracted support, especially for systems acquisitions.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/acquisitionstrat1094561307
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleACQUISITION STRATEGY IN A NON-COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT: A RESOURCE DEPENDENCY AND POWER-DEPENDENT RELATIONS PERSPECTIVEen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorpower asymmetryen_US
dc.subject.authorresource-dependenceen_US
dc.subject.authorsingle-sourceen_US
dc.subject.authorsole-sourceen_US
dc.subject.authoracquisition strategyen_US
dc.subject.authorbusiness strategyen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid30599


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