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dc.contributor.advisorWarren, Timothy C.
dc.contributor.advisorManess, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorFoote, Colin J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T22:48:39Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T22:48:39Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/61367
dc.description.abstractDigital repression of political speech gained prominence during the Arab Spring when governments acknowledged the power of networked collective action. The shutdown strategies that proliferated from the Arab Spring expanded around the globe. Now, almost a decade later, India leads the world in government-mandated digital repression. The rapid expansion of the internet and mobile penetration, combined with long-standing civil unrest, created a volatile issue within India. The use of strategic shutdowns by Indian authorities attempts to contain and reduce the conflict-related violence while limiting collateral economic damage. To investigate such efforts, this thesis examines patterns of civil violence across Indian states in the wake of digital repression events. This research employs both quantitative and qualitative approaches to analyze the relationship between violence and digital shutdowns using data on civil unrest, including protests, riots, military operations, and digital shutdowns in India. The evidence indicates that while the goal of India’s use of strategic shutdowns is to contain and reduce conflict-related violence, strategic shutdowns actually result in increased violence in the days following the shutdown event. These findings indicate that shutting off the internet and cell phone services is not an effective approach to preventing internal violence.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/digitalrepressio1094561367
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDIGITAL REPRESSION AND CONFLICT VIOLENCEen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authordigital repressionen_US
dc.subject.authorviolenceen_US
dc.subject.authorIndiaen_US
dc.subject.authorinterneten_US
dc.subject.authorcyberen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial mediaen_US
dc.subject.authorcivil unresten_US
dc.subject.authorcivil resistanceen_US
dc.subject.authorprotestsen_US
dc.subject.authorsuppressionen_US
dc.subject.authorfreedom of the neten_US
dc.subject.authorregression analysisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysis (Irregular Warfare)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysis (Irregular Warfare)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid32307
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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