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dc.contributor.authorPowell, Scott W.
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-09T22:07:23Z
dc.date.available2019-05-09T22:07:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.citationPowell, Scott W., and Michael M. Bell. "Near-Surface Frontogenesis and Atmospheric Instability along the US East Coast during the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Matthew (2016)." Monthly Weather Review 147.2 (2019): 719-732.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/62144
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/MWR-D-18-0094.1en_US
dc.description.abstractHurricane Matthew locally generated more than 400mm of rainfall on 8–9 October 2016 over the eastern Carolinas and Virginia as it transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. The heaviest precipitation occurred along a swath situated up to 100–200 km inland from the coast and collocated with enhanced low-tropospheric frontogenesis. Analyses from version 3 of the Rapid Refresh (RAPv3) model indicate that rapid frontogenesis occurred over eastern North and South Carolina and Virginia on 8 October, largely over a 12-h time period between 1200 UTC 8 October and 0000 UTC 9 October. The heaviest rainfall in Matthew occurred when and where spiral rainbands intersected the near-surface front, which promoted the lift of conditionally unstable, moist air. Parallel to the spiral rainbands, conditionally unstable low-tropospheric warm, moist oceanic air was advected inland, and the instability was apparently released as the warm air mass rose over the front. Precipitation in the spiral rainbands intensified on 9 October as the temperature gradient along the near-surface front rapidly increased. Unlike in Hurricane Floyd over the mid-Atlantic states, rainfall totals within the spiral rainbands of Matthew as they approached the near-surface front evidently were not enhanced by release of conditional symmetric instability. However, conditional symmetric instability release in the midtroposphere may have enhanced rainfall 200 km northwest of the near-surface front. Finally, although weak cold-air damming occurred prior to heavy rainfall, damming dissipated prior to frontogenesis and did not impact rainfall totals.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNOAA Climate and Global Change Postdoctoral Fellowshipen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUCAR’s Cooperative Programs for the Advancement of Earth System Scienceen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.format.extent14 p.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, it may not be copyrighteden_US
dc.titleNear-Surface Frontogenesis and Atmospheric Instability along the U.S. East Coast during the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Matthew (2016)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorologyen_US
dc.description.funderNational Science Foundation AGS-1701225en_US


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