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dc.contributor.advisorColson, William
dc.contributor.authorAllgaier, Gregory G.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:48:13Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:48:13Z
dc.date.issued2003-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/6238
dc.description.abstractA megawatt (MW) class Free Electron Laser (FEL) shows promise as a new weapon for antiship cruise missile defense. An FEL weapon system delivers energy at the speed of light at controllable energy levels, giving the war fighter new engagement options. Considerations for this weapon system include employment, design, and stability. In order to reach a MW class laser, system parameters must be optimized and the high power optical beam must be appropriately managed. In a high power FEL, the optical beam could heat and ultimately damage the optical cavity mirrors. One proposed solution is a short Rayleigh length design, which lowers the intensity on the mirrors, but increases sensitivity to vibrations. This thesis shows a that short Rayleigh length FEL will remain stable using current technology and can be designed to achieve a MW of power. Scenarios are then presented to explore some of the engagement options associated with this weapon system.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theshipboardempl109456238
dc.format.extentxvi, 70 p. : ill. (some col.) ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFree electron lasersen_US
dc.subject.lcshDirected-energy weaponsen_US
dc.subject.lcshAntiship missile defensesen_US
dc.subject.lcshWeapons systemsen_US
dc.titleThe shipboard employment of a free electron laser weapon systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderArmstead, Robert
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Physics
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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