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dc.contributor.advisorGordis, Joshua H.
dc.contributor.advisorBoger, Dan
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Nathan A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:48:15Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:48:15Z
dc.date.issued2003-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/6249
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; Distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThere are 80 million light trucks on the road today with suboptimal aerodynamic forms. Previous research has found that several miles per gallon can be saved by specifically tailoring truck bodies for reduced aerodynamic drag. Even greater savings can be obtained if the shape of the trucks is numerically optimized. This could reduce fuel consumption in the United States by billions of gallons per year. The purpose of this research is to develop and quantify optimal light truck canopy designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional models are used to do this. Initially, this research focuses on quantifying and generalizing the effects of traditional automotive aerodynamic accessories, such as canopies and air dams. Once the effects of various form factors are quantified an optimization of the canopy is performed. This thesis demonstrates a method for drag reduction using CFD and traditional numerical optimization techniques. Lastly, the optimized forms are physically constructed and their effects on fuel economy are compared to the CFD prediction. The results indicate that the CFD formulation provides an accurate predictor for improving fuel economy and drag characteristics. The prototype air dam and optimally shaped canopy generated a 21.23% savings in terms of fuel economy.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/dragoptimization109456249
dc.format.extentxviii, 165 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEnergy consumptionen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshFluid dynamicsen_US
dc.titleDrag optimization of light trucks using computational fluid dynamicsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Technology Management
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, Civil Engineer Corps, United States Naval Reserveen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Mechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Information Technology Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineInformation Technology Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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