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dc.contributor.advisorPace, Howard Jr.
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Jose A., II
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-04T18:20:01Z
dc.date.available2019-11-04T18:20:01Z
dc.date.issued2019-09
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10945/63477
dc.description.abstractThis project will examine the operational and mission availability of ships deployed with an integrated additive manufacturing (AM) capability. The purpose of this research is to determine the best option with regard to operational availability, mission availability and total ownership costs to the Navy. The objectives of this project will include a comparative analysis based on three separate scenarios that will seek to compare the operational impact cost against the total ownership cost for the Navy. The first scenario will be a baseline to show the operational availability, mission availability and total cost to the Navy utilizing the standard supply system; the second scenario integrates the use of AM onboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74); the third scenario will integrate the AM machine that will be used to manufacture the required part at a centralized shore facility in the Fifth Fleet logistics hub. Chapter I will provide an overview and background of the history and accomplishments of AM in today's Navy. Chapter II will include the literature review, and more specifically, an introduction of the formulas that will be used later in this research. Chapter III illustrates the data that was identified in the research and provides an analysis of how the data meets the objectives of this study. Chapter IV will discuss the results and provide recommendations. Chapter V will provide final thoughts and possible areas for further research.This project will examine the operational and mission availability of ships deployed with an integrated additive manufacturing (AM) capability. The purpose of this research is to determine the best option with regard to operational availability, mission availability and total ownership costs to the Navy. The objectives of this project will include a comparative analysis based on three separate scenarios that will seek to compare the operational impact cost against the total ownership cost for the Navy. The first scenario will be a baseline to show the operational availability, mission availability and total cost to the Navy utilizing the standard supply system; the second scenario integrates the use of AM onboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74); the third scenario will integrate the AM machine that will be used to manufacture the required part at a centralized shore facility in the Fifth Fleet logistics hub. Chapter I will provide an overview and background of the history and accomplishments of AM in today's Navy. Chapter II will include the literature review, and more specifically, an introduction of the formulas that will be used later in this research. Chapter III illustrates the data that was identified in the research and provides an analysis of how the data meets the objectives of this study. Chapter IV will discuss the results and provide recommendations. Chapter V will provide final thoughts and possible areas for further research.This project will examine the operational and mission availability of ships deployed with an integrated additive manufacturing (AM) capability. The purpose of this research is to determine the best option with regard to operational availability, mission availability and total ownership costs to the Navy. The objectives of this project will include a comparative analysis based on three separate scenarios that will seek to compare the operational impact cost against the total ownership cost for the Navy. The first scenario will be a baseline to show the operational availability, mission availability and total cost to the Navy utilizing the standard supply system; the second scenario integrates the use of AM onboard the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74); the third scenario will integrate the AM machine that will be used to manufacture the required part at a centralized shore facility in the Fifth Fleet logistics hub. Chapter I will provide an overview and background of the history and accomplishments of AM in today's Navy. Chapter II will include the literature review, and more specifically, an introduction of the formulas that will be used later in this research. Chapter III illustrates the data that was identified in the research and provides an analysis of how the data meets the objectives of this study. Chapter IV will discuss the results and provide recommendations. Chapter V will provide final thoughts and possible areas for further research.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/operationalandmi1094563477
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleOPERATIONAL AND MISSION READINESS IMPACT OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING DEPLOYMENT IN THE NAVY SUPPLY CHAINen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderGunduz, Ibrahim E.
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Defense Management (GSDM)
dc.subject.authorAMen_US
dc.subject.authoradditive manufacturingen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Program Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineProgram Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid32006
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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