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dc.contributor.advisorWollman, Lauren
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Shannon A.
dc.contributor.authorHaight, Kevin P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T18:13:40Z
dc.date.available2020-06-05T18:13:40Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/64917
dc.descriptionReissued 29 Sep 2020 with edits to abstract, executive summary, and figure 5.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2019, only twelve U.S. states/territories required the Emergency Communications Officer (ECO) to meet hiring standards, twenty-nine required basic training standards, twenty-three required continuing-education standards, and twenty-four required use of pre-arrival medical instruction protocols. Furthermore, the federal government misclassifies the profession within its Office and Administrative Support occupational grouping, as opposed to the Protective Service occupational grouping. There is substantial evidence of 9-1-1 failures in professionalism and proficiency, nationwide. This thesis seeks to answer the question: How could the nation’s 9-1-1 system—specifically its ECO occupation—evolve to address problems and maximize advantages to public safety and homeland security? It is a policy analysis but includes some qualitative analysis. Professionalization and standardization need to occur within the system, beginning with an accurate occupational classification. Increased compensation commensurate with the work performed is also needed, and that should be accompanied with mandated hiring, basic training and certification standards, and requirements in the use of pre-arrival medical instruction protocols. Lastly, a termination of all jurisdictional misappropriation of 9-1-1 fees, updated and sustainable funding streams, and adequate investment in technological enhancements necessary to improve the system's efficiency, proficiency, redundancy, and resiliency need to occur.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/whatsouremergenc1094564917
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.title9-1-1: WHAT’S OUR EMERGENCY? DIAGNOSING A STRUGGLING OCCUPATION SERVING A NEGLECTED SYSTEMen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (CHDS)
dc.subject.author9-1-1en_US
dc.subject.author911en_US
dc.subject.authorpublic safety telecommunicatoren_US
dc.subject.authorpublic-safety Telecommunicatoren_US
dc.subject.authoremergency dispatcheren_US
dc.subject.authoremergency telecommunicatoren_US
dc.subject.authorEmergency Communications Officeren_US
dc.subject.authorEmergency Communications Centeren_US
dc.subject.authorECOen_US
dc.subject.authorECCen_US
dc.subject.authorPSAPen_US
dc.subject.authorPublic Safety Answering Pointen_US
dc.subject.author9-1-1 dispatcheren_US
dc.subject.author911 dispatcheren_US
dc.subject.authordispatcheren_US
dc.description.serviceCivilian, Idaho State Policeen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid34062
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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