Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSigman, Rachel L.
dc.contributor.authorHarinandan, Cheyenne M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-21T00:25:55Z
dc.date.available2020-08-21T00:25:55Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/65537
dc.description.abstractThis thesis compares large-scale infrastructure projects in Ethiopia that include funding from the Chinese government to similar projects that do not include funding from Chinese sources. This thesis analyzes the construction and upgrade of the Ethiopian road network and compares roadway infrastructure projects with and without Chinese financial assistance on six criteria: (1) project selection (2) project execution and costs, (3) local job creation, including the participation of local construction and consulting firms, (4) expenses for long-term maintenance, (5) deviations in travel times and vehicle operating costs (VOCs), and (6) impacts on local communities and their agricultural sectors. Overall, there is no clear difference between road projects that include Chinese funding and projects that do not include Chinese funding. This result is mostly attributed to the capacity of the Ethiopian government, which had well-defined standard planning procedures prior to the inclusion of Chinese investment. These findings imply that the costs and benefits of Chinese investment for African countries are not simply an outcome of Chinese national policy goals, but instead are an outcome of the capacity of the local African government.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, CA; Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleHOW DO TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS WITH CHINESE FUNDING COMPARE TO TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS WITHOUT CHINESE FUNDING IN ETHIOPIA?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderEisenberg, Daniel
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorEthiopiaen_US
dc.subject.authorAfricaen_US
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorinvestmenten_US
dc.subject.authortransportationen_US
dc.subject.authorhighwayen_US
dc.subject.authorChineseen_US
dc.subject.authorrural roadsen_US
dc.subject.authorFDIen_US
dc.subject.authordonoren_US
dc.subject.authorvehicle operating costsen_US
dc.subject.authorVOCsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Junior Grade, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.identifier.thesisid32761
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release. distribution is unlimiteden_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record