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dc.contributor.authorGheorghe, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorPour, Farinaz Sabz Ali
dc.contributor.authorTatar, Unal
dc.contributor.authorKeskin, Omer Faruk
dc.contributor.otherAcquisition Research Program
dc.date05/10/21
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-01T21:24:45Z
dc.date.available2021-11-01T21:24:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-10
dc.identifier.other130
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/68166
dc.description.abstractIn the modern acquisition, it is unrealistic to consider single entities as producing and delivering a product independently. Acquisitions usually take place through supply networks. Resiliency, efficiency, and effectiveness of supply networks directly contribute to the acquisition system's resiliency, efficiency, and effectiveness. All the involved firms form a part of a supply network essential to producing the product or service. The decision-makers have to look for new methodologies for supply chain management. Blockchain technology introduces new methods of decentralization and delegation of services, which can transform supply chains and result in a more resilient, efficient, and effective supply chain. This research aims to review and analyze the selected current blockchain technology adoptions to enhance the resiliency of supply network management by facilitating collaboration and communication among suppliers and support the decision-making process. In the first part of this study, we discuss the limitations and challenges of the supply chain system that can be addressed by integrating blockchain technology. In the final part, we analyze multiple blockchain-based supply chain use cases to identify how the main features of blockchain are suited best for supply network management.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPrepared for the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA 93943.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBlockchain for a Resilient, Efficient, and Effective Supply Chain: Evidence from Casesen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.identifier.npsreportSYM-AM-21-103
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US


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