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dc.contributor.advisorDarnton, Christopher N.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Robert L., Jr.
dc.dateJune 2020
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-19T22:39:07Z
dc.date.available2022-01-19T22:39:07Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/68648
dc.description.abstractMilitary innovation studies have largely relied on monocausal accounts—rationalism, institutionalism, or culture—to explain technologically innovative and adaptive outcomes in defense organizations. None of these perspectives alone provided a compelling explanation for the adoption outcomes of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in the U.S. military from 1991 to 2015. Two questions motivated this research: Why, despite abundant material resources, mature technology, and operational need, are the most-capable UAVs not in the inventory across the services? What accounts for variations and patterns in UAV innovation adoption? The study selected ten UAV program episodes from the Air Force and Navy, categorized as high-, medium-, and low-end cases, for within-case and cross-case analysis. Primary and secondary sources, plus interviews, enabled process tracing across episodes. The results showed a pattern of adoption or rejection based on a logic-of-utility effectiveness and consistent resource availability: a military problem to solve, and a capability gap in threats or tasks and consistent monetary capacity; furthermore, ideational factors strengthened or weakened adoption. In conclusion, the study undermines single-perspective arguments as sole determinants of innovation, reveals that military culture is not monolithic in determining outcomes, and demonstrates that civil-military relationships no longer operate where civilian leaders hold inordinate sway over military institutions.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMilitary Innovation in the Third Age of U.S. Unmanned Aviation, 1991–2015en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)en_US
dc.subject.authorinnovationen_US
dc.subject.authoradaptationen_US
dc.subject.authorunmanned aerial vehiclesen_US
dc.subject.authorUAVsen_US
dc.subject.authortechnologyen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational changeen_US
dc.subject.authorU.S. militaryen_US
dc.subject.authordronesen_US
dc.subject.authorinstitutional politicsen_US
dc.subject.authororganizational cultureen_US
dc.subject.authortechnology adoptionen_US
dc.subject.authordefense organizationsen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Colonel, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameDoctor of Philosophy in Security Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelDoctoralen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.identifier.curriculumcode694 (Security Studies (PhD))


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