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dc.contributor.authorCanan, Mustafa
dc.contributor.authorAkil, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-28T23:30:39Z
dc.date.available2022-03-28T23:30:39Z
dc.date.issued2021-03
dc.identifier.citationCanan, Mustafa, and Anthony Akil. "A warfare domain approach to the disinformation problem." International Conference on Cyber Warfare and Security. Academic Conferences International Limited, 2020.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/69268
dc.description17 USC 105 interim-entered record; under temporary embargo.en_US
dc.description.abstractLand and sea were the original warfighting domains; at the turn of the 20th-century air was recognized, and roughly fifty years later, space became the fourth warfighting domain. Humanity is in the Information Age, and cyberspace is recognized as the fifth warfighting domain. Much debate surrounds this distinction. The complete lack of doctrine specifying what is required to be a domain serves to exacerbate an already contentious topic further. Many have proffered suggestions on what these requirements ought to be. For example, the literature suggests six requirements for a warfare domain, but a more accurate description of what was presented is six characteristics. If one of the six requirements were removed, any of the four physical domains would still exist as a domain. The notion of the warfare domain changed with the doctrinal codification of cyberspace. Previously, the warfare domains -land, sea, air, and space- were exclusively physical; the advent of cyberspace represents the first man-made warfare domain. While the physical, information and cognitive dimensions are accounted for in the doctrine associated with the physical domains, the same cannot be said for cyberspace. Representation of the three dimensions renders the means and ways of attacking and defending readily discernable. There are unique challenges related to cyberspace such as attribution, cyber personas, and cascading effects that make determining appropriate retaliation complex. In this context, the most prominent and difficult to defend threat vector is disinformation. In this paper, we discuss disinformation from the warfighting domain perspective. We offer a new conceptualization of cyberspace as a warfare domain. In doing so, the paper proposes recognition of the cognitive dimension in cyberspace as a solution to the problems associated with the fundamental problem in the complex information ecosystem, disinformation.en_US
dc.format.extent12 p.en_US
dc.publisherAcademic Conferences International Limiteden_US
dc.titleA Warfare Domain Approach to the Disinformation Problemen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentInformation Sciences (IS)en_US
dc.subject.authorDisinformationen_US
dc.subject.authorWarfareen_US
dc.subject.authorMisinformationen_US
dc.subject.authorDisinformingen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial-realityen_US
dc.subject.authorCyberspaceen_US
dc.description.funderU.S. Government affiliation is unstated in article text.en_US


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