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dc.contributor.advisorGreen, John M.
dc.contributor.authorCalvert, Willard
dc.contributor.authorCohn, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Gail
dc.contributor.authorHeidt, Brian
dc.contributor.authorLojek, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorMalecki, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T17:19:56Z
dc.date.available2012-05-29T17:19:56Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier311-094S
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/6961
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractSubmarines offer a capability to deploy and retrieve unmanned undersea vehicles (UUV) in littoral and blue water Areas of Operation while avoiding detection. Integration of the submarine and UUV through a launch and recovery mechanism offers unique challenges with respect to host submarine safety, UUV recovery, UUV replenishment and life-cycle costs. The Capstone team elicited launch and recovery system requirements from stakeholders and conceived four (4) advanced alternatives and a baseline alternative considered to meet the requirements. Through functional, cost, risk, modeling and qualitative analysis, this study assessed the value of each alternative to stakeholders. Of the concept alternatives explored, a high tech option featuring a carbon fiber structure, electromechanical pulse launch and recovery device and proximity vice contact battery charging and UUV stowage features provided the best value to the stakeholders for the investment. These results highlighted characteristics, including maintenance considerations, upgradeability, design for reliability and design for universal applications considered paramount for a successful system. Project lessons learned uncovered significant risk due to instability of UUV requirements as well as certification issues which adversely affect a submarine/UUV integration project. Early communications between key stakeholders must effectively address these short-comings.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/asystemtointegra109456961
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleA system to integrate unmanned undersea vehicles with a submarine host platformen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystems Engineering (SE)
dc.subject.authorUnmanned Underwater Vehicleen_US
dc.subject.authorIntelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissanceen_US
dc.subject.authorVirginia Class Submarineen_US
dc.subject.authorLaunch and Recoveryen_US
dc.subject.authorSystem Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authorDesign for Reliabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorLittoral Operationsen_US
dc.identifier.npsreportNPS-SE-11-006
etd.thesisdegree.nameMSSEen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSystems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorU.S. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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