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dc.contributorNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributorUniversity of California, Santa Barbara
dc.contributorSpecial Technologies Laboratory
dc.contributor.authorHuffmire,Ted
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Thuy
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorBotherton, Brett
dc.contributor.authorWang, Gang
dc.contributor.authorSherwood, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorKastner, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-11T15:49:39Z
dc.date.available2012-07-11T15:49:39Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-10
dc.identifier.citationACM Transactions on Reconfigurable Technology and Systems, Volume 3, Issue 2, Article No.: 10, May 10, 2010.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/7174
dc.description.abstractComputing systems designed using reconfigurable hardware are increasingly composed using a number of different Intellectual Property (IP) cores, which are often provided by third-party vendors that may have different levels of trust. Unlike traditional software where hardware resources are mediated using an operating system, IP cores have fine-grain control over the underlying reconfigurable hardware. To address this problem, the embedded systems community requires novel security primitives that address the realities of modern reconfigurable hardware. In this work, we propose security primitives using ideas centered around the notion of moats and drawbridges. The primitives encompass four design properties: logical isolation, interconnect traceability, secure reconfigurable broadcast, and configuration scrubbing. Each of these is a fundamental operation with easily understood formal properties, yet they map cleanly and efficiently to a wide variety of reconfigurable devices. We carefully quantify the required overheads of the security techniques on modern FPGA architectures across a number of different applications.en_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.rightsApproved for public release.en_US
dc.titleSecurity Primitives for Reconfigurable Hardware-Based Systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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