Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFranck, Raymond
dc.contributor.advisorParker, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorMuldoon, Richard C.
dc.contributor.authorFoo, KheeLoon “Richard”
dc.contributor.authorSiew, Hoi Kok “Daniel”
dc.contributor.authorNg, Cheow Siang
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Victor
dc.contributor.authorLim, Teng Chye ”Lawrence”
dc.contributor.authorSng, Chun Hock
dc.contributor.authorHo, Keith Jude
dc.contributor.authorBauer, David
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Steven B.
dc.contributor.authorQuast, Glen B.
dc.contributor.authorLantier, Lance
dc.contributor.authorSchuette, Bruce
dc.contributor.authorDarling, Paul R.
dc.contributor.authorSEA Cohort SEA-1
dc.contributor.otherSEA Cohort SEA-1
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-23T22:09:06Z
dc.date.available2012-07-23T22:09:06Z
dc.date.issued2001-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/7279
dc.descriptionStudent Integrated Project
dc.descriptionIncludes supplementary materialen_US
dc.description.abstractDistributing naval combat power into many small ships and unmanned air vehicles that capitalize on emerging technology offers a transformational way to think about naval combat in the littorals in the 2020 time frame. Project CROSSBOW is an engineered systems of systems that proposes to use such distributed forces to provide forward presence to gain and maiantain access, to provide sea control, and to project combat power in the littoral regions of the world. Project CROSSBOW is the result of a yearlong, campus-wide, integrated research systems engineering effort involving 40 student researchers and 15 supervising faculty members. This report (Volume I) summarizes the CROSSBOW project. It catalogs the major features of each of the components, and includes by reference a separate volume for each of the major systems (ships, aircraft, and logistics). It also prresents the results of the mission and campaign analysis that informed the trade-offs between these components. It describes certain functions of CROSSBOW in detail through specialized supporting studies. The student work presented here is technologically feasible, integrated and imaginative. The student project cannot by itself provide definitive designs or analyses covering such a broad topic. It does strongly suggest that the underlying concepts have merit and deserve further serious study by the Navy as it transforms itself.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subjectLittoral Combaten_US
dc.subjectUnmanned Vehiclesen_US
dc.subjectNaval Transformationen_US
dc.subjectDistributed Forcesen_US
dc.titleCrossbow Reporten_US
dc.title.alternativeCrossbow Volume 1
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.typeSEA Capstoneen_US
dc.contributor.corporateThe System Engineering & Integration Curriculum Students
dc.contributor.departmentSystems Engineering (SE)
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSystems Engineering Analysisen_US
dc.identifier.curriculumcode308


Files in this item

Icon
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record