Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGlosny, Michael A.
dc.contributor.authorDoss, III, Clayton Bradley
dc.date12-Jun
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-30T23:15:49Z
dc.date.available2012-07-30T23:15:49Z
dc.date.issued2012-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/7332
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThis study considers the role of coercive lever exercise in Chinese economic statecraft. Whereas the economic statecraft literature presumes larger economic powers dominate smaller economic powers, this study considers cases in which asymmetric interdependence in specific sectors allows relatively less developed states to access coercive levers as viable policy options. It found that coercive lever exercise remains rare relative to inducements in Chinese economic statecraft consistent with evolving Chinese grand strategy and political economy trends. As demonstrated in the case studies, exercise patterns were reactionary and depended on existing conditions of asymmetric interdependence with the target state. Beijing can and will exercise coercive levers in the context of a bilateral trade dispute or during select high-stakes international crises, but only to an extent that exercise supports achievement of limited political objectives such as signaling resolve, amplifying official protest, or altering short-term behavior in the target state. Though reluctant to exercise coercive levers, China�۪s capabilities are evolving and it is becoming a more confident practitioner that selects among an increasingly sophisticated range of policy options in economic statecraft. As China continues to deepen integration with the global economy, coercive levers derived from asymmetric interdependence will likely roliferate.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/coerciveleversin109457332
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.titleCoercive Levers in Chinese Economic Statecraft: Attributed Across Earth, Rarely Apparenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWeiner, Robert J.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorEconomic Statecraften_US
dc.subject.authorAsymmetric Interdependenceen_US
dc.subject.authorSanctionsen_US
dc.subject.authorRare Earthsen_US
dc.subject.authorSenkaku Islandsen_US
dc.subject.authorEast China Seaen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Southeast Asia, And The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record