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dc.contributor.advisorColson, William B.
dc.contributor.authorRamos, Luis.
dc.dateDecember 1995
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-31T19:53:10Z
dc.date.available2012-07-31T19:53:10Z
dc.date.issued1995-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/7476
dc.description.abstractThe development of a high average power FEL for military applications, whether shipboard or not, represents a significant advancement in technology over present weapons systems design. The FEL has significant advantages over conventional kinetic systems and other classical high-energy laser systems. The rapid response, wavelength tunability, and infinite magazine make the FEL a highly desirable shipboard weapon system. The initial pan of this thesis examines the advantages of a FEL over a conventional kinetic weapon. Section II explores the atmospheric phenomenan that affects the propagation of a laser beam enroute to its target. Section III presents the Boeing FEL proposal followed by the theory of the FEL. Lastly, in Sections V, VI, simulations are conducted to analyze the FEL's feasibility.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/atmosphericpropa109457476
dc.format.extent53 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleAtmospheric propagation simulations and Boeing's high average power free electron laseren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentApplied Physics
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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