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dc.contributor.authorDunlap, Gary H.
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:17:51Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:17:51Z
dc.date.issued1999-06-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/7977
dc.descriptionCIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis documenten_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis analyzes the material flows, manpower usage, administrative requirements and procedures, and technical interface needs employed in the logistics systems onboard aircraft carriers and submarines to determine where Information Technology (IT) could be applied to reduce life cycle costs and manning demands. The concepts and recommendations derived from this study support the Focused Logistics pillar of Joint Vision 2010 (JV 2010), and guidance of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act (FASA), the Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA), and DoD Directive 5000.1 (March 15, 1996) to incorporate proven commercial business practices into DoD processes. The first step was to baseline the existing logistics infrastructure for two platforms, namely the aircraft carrier and the submarine, to identify what could be done with IT to make the process more effective. In addition, a broad area search of Navy wide logistics IT insertion initiatives, and numerous discussions with logistics experts across the Navy and their supporting contractor base were made to ensure that recommendations would be pertinent to current issues. Once the data was all compiled, it was analyzed to identify any gaps which could be potentially solved through the insertion of IT. This analysis indicated that the computer migration plan under the Naval Tactical Command Support Systems (NTCSS) application programs was progressing smoothly, and that the communication connectivity issues associated with exchanging real time data were also well underway through the Information Technology 21st Century (IT-21) initiatives. The one glaring area which was demanding a great deal of time for shipboard supply personnel, and was not getting much attention by the Navy logistics leadership, was in the data acquisition point in the system. Thus, for logistics, material tagging technology in support of more efficient receipt and inventory actions needed to be investigateden_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/appliedinformati109457977
dc.format.extent126 p.;28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleApplied Information Technology (IT) for ship design, production and lifecycle support : a total systems approachen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateMassachusetts Institute of Technology
dc.description.funderCIVINSen_US
dc.identifier.oclcocn640940032
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Naval Construction and Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Ocean Systems Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNaval Construction and Engineering XIII-A;Ocean Systems Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US


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