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dc.contributor.advisorDell, Robert F.
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, J. Enrique Reyes
dc.dateDecember 1999
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:18:06Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:18:06Z
dc.date.issued1999-12-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8008
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIn an era when mines are inexpensive and easily accessible, present mine detection and area reconnaissance capabilities are insufficient to enable unencumbered maneuver in the littoral regions. Unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs) possess potential to provide tactical commanders with full understanding of the mine threat without risk to ships or personnel and without exposing intentions. By integrating an assortment of emerging capabilities, a system comprised of a variety of UUVs could address this mine threat. This thesis develops and implements the Mine Reconnaissance System Assessment (MiRSA) model, a mixed integer-linear program, to assign a mix of UUVs to search areas within a suspected minefield. Using unclassified UUV performance estimates, this thesis compares combinations of two Long-term Mine Reconnaissance System (LMRS) vehicles, six Remote Environmental Monitoring Units (REMUS) vehicles, and a notional Manta vehicle. For a 262 square nautical mile area in the Straits of Hormuz, MiRSA finds the two LMRS vehicles can complete a 95% confidence level search in 91 hours, the Manta vehicle can complete the search in 130 hours, and the two LMRS vehicles with Manta employed optimally together require only 52 hours. For an exhaustive search, times rise sharply: Manta operating alone requires 1,004 hours and optimal employment of the two LMRS, six REMUS, and Manta vehicles finish the search in 384 hours.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.archive.org/details/assigningunmanne00diaz
dc.format.extentxx, 39 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleAssigning Unmanned Undersea Vehicles (UUVs) to mine detection operationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderBrutzman, Don
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Operations Research
dc.subject.authorUnmanned undersea vehicleen_US
dc.subject.authorLong-term mine reconnaissance systemen_US
dc.subject.authorRemote environmental monitoring unitsen_US
dc.subject.authorMantaen_US
dc.subject.authorMine detectionen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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