Boro-silicate polycapillary lens for collimation of x-rays

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Authors
Chase, Michael B.
Subjects
X-ray focusing
Transition radiation
Linear accelerator
X-ray lithography
Polycapillaries
Advisors
Maruyama, Xavier K.
Harkins, Richard M.
Date of Issue
1997-06
Date
June 1997
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
eng
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the collimation of x rays produced by transition radiation using the NPS Electron Linear Accelerator. These measurements support the theory that x rays can be focused using a boro-silicate array of polycapillaries consisting of 258 bundles with 1387 micro- channels each. A 90 MeV electron beam incident upon a non-resonant mylar stack formed transition radiation spatially distributed in an annular cone. The electron beam was deflected 30 degrees using a rare earth permanent magnet. The diverging x-rays incident upon the lens array were transported through total external reflection and directed out of the array onto a phosphor screen. A digital camera recorded the phosphorescing image of the screen. Pixel intensity was analyzed to determine x ray intensity as a function of two dimensional spatial distribution. Column average profiles of the pixel intensity show that the transition radiation intensity retains its Gaussian distribution after being redirected from a diverging beam into a mostly parallel beam. The intensity of the x-rays decreased by a factor of 0.72 due to the obstructed area at the face of the array and to imperfect admittance of the diverging x ray cone into the polycapillary array.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Department of Physics
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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