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dc.contributor.advisorMelich, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorHarney, Robert C.
dc.contributor.authorAlper, Irfan H.
dc.dateJune 1999
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:18:45Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:18:45Z
dc.date.issued1999-06-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8097
dc.description.abstractGround vehicle mobility advances for the future combat vehicles fleet will be achieved through smaller and lighter systems with improved weapon stabilization, improved ride and agility, and reduced acoustic/IR signatures. The Iguana(trademark), a tracked vehicle concept based on a recently patented suspension and track design, could deploy to hot spots world-wide on peacekeeping and combat missions which require extra flexibility to adapt to diverse terrain, weather and threat conditions. A sophisticated sensor suite integrated with weapon systems will guarantee battlefield dominance and vehicle survivability can be enhanced with revolutionary composite armor. Hybrid electric drive will mainly enhance survivability, fuel economy, stealth, operational capability and acceleration performance. Power electronics developments will speed up the transformation from conventional gas engines to hybrid armored vehicle drive systems. This thesis presents a combat system integration process for an Iguana(trademark) based armored vehicle. It lays out steps to be taken in conceiving and developing the armored vehicle starting from the Mission Need Statement. Scenarios are used to create a context within which to define realistic operational requirements. Functional flow modeling for the interoperable reconnaissance, forward observer and anti-guerrilla version armored vehicles provides the analytical basis for defining subsystem characteristics. A particularly important operational need is for night vision sensors. The U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate's ELIR92 and ACQUIRE computer programs are used to establish feasible Iguana(trademark) thermal night vision device performance requirements.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/thecombatsystemd109458097
dc.format.extentx, 109 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleThe combat system design and test criteria for Iguana(tm) armored vehiclesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physics
dc.subject.authorCombat systemen_US
dc.subject.authorArmored vehicleen_US
dc.subject.authorFLIR92en_US
dc.subject.authorACQUIREen_US
dc.subject.authorComputer armoren_US
dc.subject.authorHybrid electric driveen_US
dc.subject.authorMobilityen_US
dc.subject.authorMission need statementen_US
dc.subject.authorOperation requirement documenten_US
dc.description.serviceFirst Lieutenant, Turkish Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Applied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineApplied Physicsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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