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dc.contributor.authorWisher, Robert A.
dc.contributor.authorHartman, Frederick E.
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Charles G.
dc.contributor.authorCiavarelli, Anthony
dc.date2011
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:05:56Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:05:56Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/824
dc.description.abstractThe study examined the time-course results of planning and executing training from the inception of a new system to its acquisition and support after fielding, in particular for Major Defense Acquisition Programs. This study is the first phase in addressing these issues surrounding the impact of partial, inadequate, misguided, or diminished resources for training for new systems. This phase gathered evidence from the literature published over the past 30 years, consolidated that evidence into a database, and searched for potential gaps between what was done and what could have been done given the extant level of knowledge about training. Reports were identified and coded across 36 variables. More than 4,000 technical reports and 500 General Accountability Office reports were analyzed for inclusion, with more than 75 being coded. A gap analysis was conducted which searched for differences between an 'existing status' and a 'potential status.' Four types of gaps were identified: knowledge gaps, awareness gaps, implementation gaps, and commitment gaps. The analysis yielded 26 instances of gaps, validating the need for a more critical treatment of training in major acquisitions. The gap and trend analysis of this data provide a start point for the second phase of the study which, based on the current findings, examines a series of selected systems for detailed training assessment through a case study methodology.en_US
dc.format.extentviii, 76 p.: col. ill.;28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMOVES Instituteen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.titleAnalysis of system training impact for major defense acquisition programsen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.).
dc.contributor.corporateMOVES Institute.
dc.contributor.departmentMOVES Institute
dc.subject.authorTraining.en_US
dc.subject.authorPreparedness.en_US
dc.identifier.oclcocn765975944
dc.identifier.npsreportNPS-MV-11-001


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