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dc.contributor.advisorAdler, Richard W.
dc.contributor.advisorLebaric, Jovan E.
dc.contributor.authorLintz, William A
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:19:59Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:19:59Z
dc.date.issued1997-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8302
dc.description.abstractEvery object has the ability to radiate and scatter electromagnetic waves. The ability to predict frequencies of maximum radiation or scattering has been limited to simple objects, such as dipoles, or objects with high degrees of symmetry. This thesis describes modifications that can be made to a computational electromagnetic technique, the Method of Moments, to allow for such. predictions to be made for complex metallic objects. This new technique has been implemented as a MATLAB computer program and tested on objects with known resonance frequencies. Finally, the code's ability to handle large complex objects is demonstrated by investigating the resonance frequencies for a Cessna aircraften_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/electromagneticr109458302
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshMAGNETIC RESONANCEen_US
dc.titleElectromagnetic resonances of metallic bodiesen_US
dc.subject.authorNatural Resonance Frequencyen_US
dc.subject.authorNatural Frequency Modesen_US
dc.subject.authorEigen Analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorElectromagnetic Radiation Wavesen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Electrical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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