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dc.contributor.advisorLucas, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorEfimba, Motale E.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:29:40Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:29:40Z
dc.date.issued2003-09
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution in unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis uses an agent-based simulation model named EINSTein to perform an exploratory study on the feasibility of using Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs) to augment or replace the current defenses of Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESG). Specifically, LCS's ability to help defend an ESGs in an anti-access scenario against a high-density small boat attack is simulated. Numbers of CRUDES (CRUiser, DEStroyer, Frigate) ships are removed and LCSs are added to the ESG force structure in varying amounts to identify force mixes that minimize ship losses. In addition, this thesis explores various conceptual capabilities that might be given to LCS. For example, helicopter/Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicles (helo/UCAVs), Stealth technology, close-in high volume firepower, and 50+ knot sprint capability. Using graphical analysis, analysis of variance, and large-sample comparison tests we find that being able to control aircraft is the most influential factor for minimizing ship losses. Stealth technology is another significant factor, and the combination of the two is highly effective in reducing ship losses. Close-in high volume firepower is effective only when interacting with helo/UCAVs or stealth. 50+ knot sprint capability is potentially detrimental in this scenario. An effective total sum of CRUDES ships and LCS is between five and seven platforms.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/855
dc.format.extentxxvi, 358 p. : ill. (some col.) ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWarshipsen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshAmphibious assault shipsen_US
dc.titleAn exploratory analysis of littoral combat ships' ability to protect expeditionary strike groupsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderGottfried, Russell
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research
dc.subject.authorEinsteinen_US
dc.subject.authorLCSen_US
dc.subject.authorLittoral Combat Shipen_US
dc.subject.authorESGen_US
dc.subject.authorExpeditionary Strike Groupen_US
dc.subject.authorAssured Accessen_US
dc.subject.authorAgent-Based Simulation.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Reseachen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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