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dc.contributor.advisorDarken, Rudolph P.
dc.contributor.advisorFalby, John S.
dc.contributor.authorLawson, John P.
dc.dateSeptember 1998
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:21:53Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:21:53Z
dc.date.issued1998-09-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8619
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIt is uncertain what effect presence has on virtual environments (VEs) but it is believed to enhance both learning and enjoyment. To date, there exists only subjective methods of measuring the level ofpresence in VEs. In order to effectively utilize VE technology, it isnecessary to gain a greater understanding of presence and thefactors that affect it. Therefore, we need to develop a quantifiable method of measuring presence. This metric would provide a framework for design requirementsfor predictable, repeatable performance in VEs. To investigatea proposed new metric, 70 individuals participated in an experiment based on the dual taskparadigm of attention theory. Thepurpose of the experiment was todetermine the level of presence orengagement in one experience asa function of disengagement from a concurrent experience. Participants received two simultaneous experiences, one virtual, the other real, and were given quizzes on each to determine their focus of attention at various stages. Results indicate (1) HMDs occlude all but one of concurring experiences preventing the dividing of attentional resources. (2) Including sound increases the level of engagement in an experience and allows for dividing of attentional resources between concurrent experiences. (3) Responses to previously established presence questionnaires correlate strongly with this new measurement of engagement indicating that this method does have validity. (4) Primed participants exhibit a decrease in levels of engagement in both experiences due to the focus of attention being divided.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.archive.org/details/levelofpresenceo00laws
dc.format.extentxiv, 144 p.;28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleLevel of presence or engagement in one experience as a function of disengagement from a concurrent experienceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Computer Science
dc.subject.authorModeling and simulationen_US
dc.subject.authorMeasuring presenceen_US
dc.subject.authorVirtual environmentsen_US
dc.subject.authorVirtual realityen_US
dc.subject.authorComputer graphicsen_US
dc.subject.authorMeasuring presence in VEen_US
dc.subject.authorMeasuring presence in VRen_US
dc.subject.authorTelepresenceen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Computer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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