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dc.contributor.advisorCallahan, Mary
dc.contributor.advisorLavoy, Peter
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, David L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:22:36Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:22:36Z
dc.date.issued1996-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8747
dc.description.abstractWhy do countries want nuclear weapons? This question has plagued non- proliferation and U.S. intelligence experts since the beginning of the nuclear era. Motivations for nuclear weapons typically are viewed as the product of external variables (perceived insecurity, prestige, etc.). This thesis asserts that a different level of analysis is appropriate. It is a society's beliefs about nuclear technology that at least partially explains nuclear proliferation. The 1939 U.S. decision to develop nuclear weapons is examined in light of early American beliefs about nuclear technology. I show that various cultural texts and statements by influential elites made policy makers believe in the military utility of nuclear energy. If these texts and statements had not existed, President Roosevelt might not have launched the Manhattan Projecten_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/nuclearmythsndso109458747
dc.format.extentxii, 82 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.subject.lcshNUCLEAR PROLIFERATIONen_US
dc.titleNuclear myths and social discourse: the U.S. decision to pursue nuclear weaponsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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