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dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, Glenn E.
dc.contributor.advisorGhoreishi, Ahmad
dc.contributor.authorJasper, Marc W
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-09T19:23:36Z
dc.date.available2012-08-09T19:23:36Z
dc.date.issued1997-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/8949
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the origins and consequences of U.S. security assistance in the Persian Gulf. I argue that the American policy of creating regional superpowers' in the Gulf has failed to adequately secure U.S. interests. It has had the unintended consequence of increasing instability. The failure of the twin pillars' policy - as the Nixon Doctrine became known in the Gulf - is evidenced by the fall of one pillar (the Shah's Iran), serious domestic troubles in the second pillar (Saudi Arabia), and, most important, the advent of a large, continuous and direct U.S. military presence in the Gulf. Such a U.S. presence is what the policy was designed to prevent. Further, I offer an original interpretation of the origins of the Nixon Doctrine. Only tangentially related to Vietnam, the Nixon Doctrine was centrally concerned with the Gulf, and in particular with providing securityresources to Iran and Saudi Arabia to safeguard U.S. interests. The doctrine was driven as much by domestic political pressures as it was by geostrategic concerns. In order to implement the Nixon Doctrine, the U.S. privately advocated raising international oil prices in the early l970s in order to allow Iran and Saudi Arabia to purchase advanced weapons systemsen_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/securityssistanc109458949
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.titleSecurity assistance in the Persian Gulf and the roots of the Nixon Doctrineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorArms Transfersen_US
dc.subject.authorPersian Gulfen_US
dc.subject.authorNixon Doctrineen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United State's Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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