Publication:
Source development for a seismo-acoustic sonar

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Authors
Fitzpatrick, Sean M.
Subjects
Mine warfare
mine detection
buried ordnance detection
seismo-acoustic sonar
seismic surface waves
Rayleigh waves
Scholte waves
Advisors
Muir, Thomas G.
Baker, Steven R.
Healey, Anthony J.
Date of Issue
1998-12-01
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
Buried mines in the beach and surf zone hinder Naval power projection beach assault operations and endanger humans. In this research, it is demonstrated that seismic interface waves on the surface of a natural beach can be used to detect buried, mine-like objects. A seismic sonar system, employing guided interface waves known as Rayleigh or Scholte waves has been proposed for detecting shallow, buried ordnance and is the subject of an ongoing, ONR- sponsored research program at the Naval Postgraduate School. The primary purpose of this research was to develop an improved seismic source to evaluate further the concept of using a seismo-acoustic sonar to detect buried ordnance in the beach and surf zone. The developed source was based upon a linear magnetic force actuator. Additionally, testing procedures were developed for follow-on research. Seismic interface waves were generated with two, 25-lb force- controlled linear actuators operated as shakers. The waves were measured with a two-element horizontal array of three axis seismometers. Buried, mine-like objects, ranging from 71kg to 290kg, and at ranges of up to 5 meters were echo- located by visual examination of the raw, recorded seismic signal, and by the use of polarization filtering signal processing
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Thesis
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Format
x, 98 p.;28 cm.
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Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
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