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dc.contributor.advisorKnopf, Jeffrey W.
dc.contributor.authorScott, Gerald R.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:29:55Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:29:55Z
dc.date.issued2003-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/907
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe federal government has undertaken a massive reorganization in order to create the Department of Homeland Security, and a parallel debate over how to organize homeland security functions has arisen at the State and Local government levels. In a time of severe budget constraints and rapidly changing threats, governments at all levels recognize the need for multiple government agencies, the private sector and nongovernmental organizations to work together in order to provide effective homeland security. The effort to improve cooperation, especially at the "first responder" level, has become a major priority in the homeland security arena. How then can local governments improve interagency cooperation for homeland security? A recent conference of government officials and homeland security experts concluded that the central coast of California has one of the best emergency preparedness systems in the country. This thesis examines the high level of interagency cooperation that has arisen among public safety agencies in Monterey County, California in order to determine what factors have contributed to their success and how they might be applied in other situations. The author proposes that theories from multiple disciplines can provide insight into the likelihood and ability of organizations to cooperate.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/bureaucraciescom10945907
dc.format.extentxii, 92 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAdministrative agenciesen_US
dc.subject.lcshManagementen_US
dc.subject.lcshReorganizationen_US
dc.subject.lcshIntergovernmental cooperationen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleBureaucracies, communities and networks : interagency cooperation for Homeland Security In Monterey Countyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderLavoy, Peter R.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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