Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorQing Wang
dc.contributor.authorEleuterio, Daniel P.
dc.dateJune 2004
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-22T15:30:39Z
dc.date.available2012-08-22T15:30:39Z
dc.date.issued2004-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/9928
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe ability of the U.S. Navy's Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) (Trademark) to accurately forecast the height and structure of the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) in the coastal zone is analyzed and compared to surface and aircraft observations from the Dynamics and Evolution of Coastal Stratus (DECS) field study conducted along the central coast of California from June 16 to July 22, 1999. The stratus field was found to have significant mesoscale variability within 100 km of the coast due to interaction between the mean flow and the coastal terrain. This structure is consistent with general hydraulic flow theory and the development of a low-level coastal jet. However, the specific characteristics on any given day were very sensitive to flow direction, inversion height, and synoptic conditions. With some modifications, the model predicted the general evolution of these events with qualitative fidelity, but was slow to dissipate the cloud and frequently produced surface fog versus stratus. A consistent tendency was found in the model's predictions of inversion heights 200-300 meters too low, weak inversion strengths, high integrated liquid water content, and weak buoyancy flux near the cloud top. These observed biases are consistent with underestimating the cloud top entrainment velocity and entrainment fluxes in the modeled boundary layer. An explicit entrainment parameterization was developed to better represent the sub-grid scale processes at cloud top and was tested in the single column and 3D versions of COAMPS. The entrainment parameterization was found to improve the boundary layer height and cloud liquid water content as compared to field observations, but the modeled boundary layer still exhibited a low bias, and the entrainment velocity was higher than is generally expected from field studies for this regime. (2 tables, 53 figures. 80 refs.) ANNOTATION: The Role of Cloud-Top Entrainment in Coastal Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layers.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/coastalstratocum109459928
dc.format.extentx, 122p. : col. ill.: 28 cm.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAir flow.en_US
dc.titleCoastal stratocumulus topped boundary layers and the role of cloud-top entrainmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorology
dc.subject.authorAuthor's subject terms: Entrainmenten_US
dc.subject.authorCloud-Topped Marine Boundary Layeren_US
dc.subject.authorMesoscale Modelingen_US
dc.subject.authorCOAMPSen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameDoctor of Philosophy in Meteorologyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMeteorologyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record