Series:
Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program Capstone Projects

Series Type
Degree-Earning Works
Description
ID

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 11
  • Publication
    Southern Border Security Control
    (2011-04-15) Chandler, Dawn; Dachos, John; DeBary-Kesner, Barbara; Howard, Jimmy; Springs, Sherry; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Operations Research (OR)
    The Southern Border Security Control Capabilities Based Assessment (CBA) is the second part of a Homeland Security (DHS) two-phased initiative to meet the potentially significant illegal alien and immigration crisis resulting from devastating natural disasters in Mexico and South America. This CBA will scope the problem, identify necessary DHS capabilities to combat the problem, and examine current capabilities to identify capability gaps. The CBA will then assess the operational risks caused by the gaps and identify potential materiel and non-materiel solutions to reduce risk and fulfill the mission of protection the United States southern border.
  • Publication
    Certified Ejection Seat Weight Ranges and their Effects on Personnel Selection
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2014-09) Jones, Thomas C.; Shattuck, Lawrence; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    Current ejection seat certified aircrew weight ranges (136 to 213 lbs.), such as for the F/A-18, prohibited over one third (38%) of women and (8%) of men from accessing the naval aviation strike pipeline (carrierbased aviation) between 2008 and 2013. This is deleterious to the Naval Aviation Enterprise to restrict access of otherwise qualified and talented applicants to the strike aviation pipeline due to an outdated anthropometric survey based specification. The acceptable level of risk that was utilized by the Naval Aviation Systems Command was overly conservative and needs to be updated to align with current operational risk management principles, actual ejection seat performance mishap data and the naval aviation anthropometric population. This research is a deep exploration of all aspects of this issue and makes recommendations that can be used by Commander of Naval Air Forces in establishing an operational weight limit for all ejection seat aircraft.
  • Publication
    The U.S. civil service personnel management system: a human-organization interface view
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2014-12) Kilgore, Maura Rudy; Smith, Christian; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    The federal government’s rigidly structured civil service personnel management system creates a climate of inflexibility and stasis, where length of service is prioritized above innovative, responsive performance. The nature of work has changed in the nearly seven decades since the current personnel system was implemented. Over time, the federal workforce has become increasingly knowledge-based, professionalized, and mature. At the macroergonomic level, the civil service personnel management organization is a system interface through which human work performance and job design is managed. It is possible to evaluate problems that exist within the human-organizational interface (HOI) and formulate recommendations for changes to improve harmonization. This review identified and focused on specific elements within the personnel management system that need to change. Effort should be applied by OPM and their component agencies to target specific areas of rigidity, complexity, and hierarchical structure to improve the predictability, adaptability, responsiveness, and flexibility of the civil service personnel management system. OPM should translate the merit system principles through improved operational guidance to more accurately mirror and more fully implement those principles. If this is accomplished, it will lead to improved harmonization between the organizational system and civil service employees who interact with it.
  • Publication
    HSI Framework for Organizations
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2014-09) Shihady, Jessica L.; Smith, Kip; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    In the United States Air Force (USAF), a system is generally thought of in terms of technology; but there are other types of systems supporting our warfighters. A system is “a group of related parts that move or work together” (Merriam-Webster, 2014), suggesting that systems can also be a compilation of human activities and interactions. One such system is the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS). The AFMS has been charged with the delivery of healthcare for the USAF. It is an organization within which there are many workplaces, and these are prototypical of workplaces in the USAF. The USAF currently has no framework for developing organizations. This capstone project took an inside look into the organizational structure of the Keesler Air Force Base’s Base Operational Medicine Cell (BOMC). By conducting a macroergonomic analysis, I was able to make recommendations for an effective and fully harmonized organizational design. Human systems integration (HSI) played a pivotal role in the evaluation of the Keesler BOMC, as Manpower, Personnel, and Training (MPT) are key drivers in the development of organizations. The results of this analysis lead to the development of BOMC requirements and subsequently HSI requirements for organizations, or an HSI Framework for Organizations.
  • Publication
    Tailoring MIL-STD-1472G: developing a system–level MANPRINT requirements document for contract use in the acquisition of military ground combat vehicles
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2013-09) Swain, Deborah L.; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    This document has been created to initiate an artifact which can be further developed into a hard contract requirements document that will mandate human design requirements as critical and requiring accountability on programs. By quantifying high-level HSI requirements, human engineers are able to provide the pass/fail criteria sought by hardware engineers. The battle now is to review those documents which we use on a daily basis and tailor out those that fall under systems design and sub-systems design. Currently, human engineering documents are organized to cover general design and detailed design all in one paragraph. The intention of tailoring these requirements out and breaking them down by domain is to increase the ease of reviewing these documents and only provide the up-front information that’s most critical for design of a specific system.
  • Publication
    Localized Electromagnetic Directed Disrupter Device (LED3) HSI Trade-Off Analyses
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2011-04-00) Chandler, Dawn; Dachos, John; DeBary-Kesner, Barbara; Howard, Jimmy; Springs, Sherry; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Office of the Under Secretary; Homeland Security; Operations Research (OR)
    Consider the impact on the program if maintenance personnel must provide repair of 20 systems (rather than 8 – 10 systems as currently envisioned) Consider domains such as Personnel, HFE, or Training (not necessarily all three) as a means to compensate for the loss of manpower.
  • Publication
    Becoming a MANPRINT Team Player
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2014-09) Sapp, Jared J.; Shattuck, Lawrence; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    MANPRINT efforts have the greatest impact when initiated early in the acquisition process, when changes to a system can be made most easily. At this point in time, MANPRINT activities are funded directly by the Program Manager (PM)/Program Executive Office (PEO), who do not tend to allocate appropriate funding for early MANPRINT efforts. For this reason, HRED FE personnel must become MANPRINT salesmen and promote the value of their inclusion and market themselves to the acquisition managers. As support of acquisition programs early in their lifecycle has the greatest need for guidance, this document will largely discuss methods for moving MANPRINT â to the leftâ that can be undertaken at the HRED FE working level. Specifically, this document will detail how to become part of the PMâ s team and what activities would best support the PM once included.
  • Publication
    Sleep Requirements for Flight Support Personnel
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School., 2014-09) Johnson, Shawn C.; Shattuck, Nita Lewis; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR)
    Expeditionary Helicopter Sea Combat Squadrons (HSC) operate on Navy amphibious assault ships to provide search and rescue (SAR), logistics and combat support. When embarked, the detachments are the primary SAR asset and have requirements levied upon them by NAVAIR 00-80T-106 to maintain aircraft SAR readiness postures in support of ship and embarked Marine Corps aircraft operations. The goal of this study was to identify what impacts would occur to flight support personnel effectiveness if OPNAV 3710.7U sleep requirements were deviated from in order to meet minimum personnel requirements. The conclusion reached was that safety concerns are present when OPNAV 3710.7U sleep requirements for flight support personnel are violated to maintain NAVAIR 00-80T-106 operational requirements. The study found that worker effectiveness varies systematically with the duration of sleep interruption encountered. Minimum predicted effectiveness comes at three hours with the predicted values at two, three and four hours being essentially equal. When sleep interruptions exceed 1.55 hours, effectiveness levels drop below 70%, equivalent to experiencing a .08 BAC. A model for subsequent interruptions over the preceding days found that worker effectiveness varies systematically with the number of days between interruptions. The effect of sleep interruptions of multiple nights was greatest two days between interruptions. A minimum of four to five days between sleep interruptions is required for interruption effects to not be cumulative.
  • Publication
    Localized Electromagnetic Directed Disrupter Device (LED3) Test and Evaluation Plan for Option 2A
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2011) Chandler, Dawn; Dachos, John; DeBary-Kesner, Barbara; Howard, Jimmy; Springs, Sherry; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Office of the Under Secretary; Homeland Security; Operations Research (OR)
    Provides border security with a non-lethal materiel solution to holistically protect the refugees, DHS personnel, and U.S. citizens from crime or personnel threat elements'_ Enables border security to non-lethally stop vehicles in motion, allowing safe interdiction's Establishes a ground mounted, self-protecting materiel solution capable of being controlled and monitored remotely while non-lethal to humans and animals
  • Publication
    Human Systems Integration Plan (HSIP) Outline Localized Electromagnetic Directed Disrupter Device (LED3)
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2011-05-13) Chandler, Dawn; Dachos, John; DeBary-Kesner, Barbara; Howard, Jimmy; Springs, Sherry; Human Systems Integration (HSI) Certificate Program; Operations Research (OR); Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences (GSOIS); Office of the Under Secretary; Homeland Security; Operations Research (OR)
    Program Management Office (PMO) is concerned over the proposed manning levels and its impact to costs. The HSI team contends that the proposed manning aligns with current Homeland Security (DHS) manning policies and is required to support, operate, and maintain the Localized Electromagnetic Directed Disrupter Device (LED3) system. Maintainer training pipeline IAW Personnel Job Task Analysis requires at least six weeks of training. Extra cost of convening days ($143.00 a day per student) is supported by the business case analysis showing an expected higher Operator Availability (Ao) and lower repair bills from corrective maintenance, thereby reducing Total Ownership Costs (TOC).