Organization:
Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)

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2022
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Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 493
  • Publication
    Welcome Manpower Systems Analysis 2019 Thesis Day
    (Monterey, California, Naval Postgraduate School, 2019-03) Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
  • Publication
    Evaluation of Performance Based Logistics
    (2006-08) Gansler, Jacques S.; Lucyshyn, William; Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Acquisition Research Program (ARP)
    The National Defense Strategy of the United States of America (NDS) establishes a set of overarching defense objectives that guide DoD’s security actions and provides direction for the National Military Strategy (NMS). It was developed based on the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) process and is focused on preparing DoD to meet 21st century challenges. One of the four implementation guidelines, which it details, is “Continuous Transformation.” The purpose of continuous transformation “is to extend key advantages and reduce vulnerabilities.”
  • Publication
    Effective Communication Practices during Organizational Transformation
    (2007) King, Cynthia L.; Brook, Douglas; Hartge, TimothyD; Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
  • Publication
    New patterns of collaboration and rivalry in the US and European Defense and Aerospace industries
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2009) Franck, Chip; Lewis, Ira A.; Udis, Bernard; Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
    This report continues our efforts to provide useful insights and a partial framework for understanding ongoing developments in the international defense marketplace. Among other things, defense industrial affairs are becoming increasingly global and increasingly complex. In this discussion, we focus more on defense firms--considering the organization of Boeing 787 development and production, the KC-45 aerial tanker competition, and European defense firms' direct investment in the US defense market. In the 787 case, we observe that even experienced companies such as Boeing can run afoul of the complexities of coordinating a multiform venture. The KC-45, at least so far, seems to illustrate a new weakness of defense establishments relative to their suppliers. It is reasonable to suppose the two rival bidders (NG-EADS and Boeing) will continue to have veto powers over source selection--absent some fresh thinking. European defense firms' (BAE, EADS and Finmeccanica) entry into the US defense market through various direct investment strategies results from an increasingly globalized defense market. More importantly, perhaps, it demonstrates their ability to work around obstacles posed by US legislative and regulatory barriers. One major theme is that increased complexity of agile suppliers' methods and relationships poses significant problems for their bureaucratic customers.
  • Publication
    Transaction costs from a program manager's perspective
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2009) Angelis, Diana; Dillard, John; Raymond, Franck; Francois, Melese; Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
    This study analyzes results from a survey of US Air Force Program Managers undertaken in 2008 by the National Research Council. The theoretical foundations of our supporting inquiry come from Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) and Agency Theory. In particular, we are concerned with the complications and costs of dealing with partners both outside DoD (TCE) and within (Principal-Agent Problem). The number of oversight reviews has steadily increased, with increasingly higher-level involvement. Accordingly, the resources and management attention devoted to these reviews has also increased. The NRC study attempted to assess program reviews with respect to value added and various costs incurred. Our analysis of the survey results distinguishes between technical and programmatic reviews. Technical reviews are conducted by the program manager (as principal) to monitor technical progress of the system contractors (agents). Programmatic reviews provide management oversight of the program manager (as agent) by higher-level authorities in DoD or Congress (principals). Our results suggest that program managers found some real value in some of their programmatic reviews, despite the common perception that reviews create excessive and burdensome levels of oversight. In addition, we found that program mangers gave relatively less value to technical reviews, a result some might find counterintuitive.
  • Publication
    Showcase of selected faculty and students research
    (Monterey, California, Naval Postgraduate School., 2012) Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP)
  • Publication
    United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) CONTRUCTION MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK December 2009
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, 2010-02-11) Hearl, Christopher; Contract Management (CM); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Acquisition Research Program (ARP); Contract Management; Graduate Student
    This handbook is meant to serve as a tactical guide for Contingency Contracting Officers (CCOs) performing construction-focused activities within the USSOCOM theatre of operations. This handbook is not intended to override or contradict any applicable regulation, policy, or standard operating procedure, nor is it intended to cover contingency contracting principles from A-Z. For an overview of contingency contracting fundamentals, see the USSOCOM Contingency Contracting Module or Contingency Contracting-A Joint Handbook for the 21st Century. As an acquisition professional, a CCO should always practice responsible stewardship, flexibility, and adaptability to best support mission objectives. While this handbook will provide examples, possible solution sets, and guiding principles for successful construction management by a CCO, no two contingency experiences are the same. Thus, this handbook is intended to help the CCO operate with a synergistic approach to integrating the joint capabilities of the expeditionary environment.
  • Publication
    Army contracting command workforce model analysis
    (Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy, 2010-10-04) Reed, Timothy; Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
  • Publication
    Graduate School of Business & Public Policy
    (Monterey, California; Naval Postgraduate School, 2013-11) Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
  • Publication
    Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) Research Newsletter / Winter 2013
    (Monterey, California : Naval Postgraduate School, 2013) Business & Public Policy (GSBPP); Graduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)