Organization:
Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR)

orgunit.page.dateEstablished
orgunit.page.dateDissolved
City
Country
Description
Type
Website of the organization
ID

Publication Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 170
  • Publication
    Shemella and Tomb Co-Edit New Volume Entitled “Security Forces in African States: Cases and Assessment”
    (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, 2017-03-21) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs (NSA)
    CCMR faculty and staff have collaborated to publish a new book focusing on the role of security forces in African countries. The volume, entitled “Security Forces in African States: Cases and Assessment,” is edited by former CTFP director/CCMR instructor Paul Shemella along with Nicholas Tomb, current director of the AFRICA Program.
  • Publication
    CCMR MASL Listings (2005)
    (2014-06-04) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs (NSA)
  • Publication
    Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR)
    (Monterey, California: Naval Postgraduate School, 2004) Hoffman, Richard; Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR)
  • Publication
    Final Report of the ASEAN Defense Ministers Meeting Plus Counter Terrorism Exercise
    (Monterey, California, Naval Postgraduate School, 2014-01-09) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs (NSA)
    Final report of the ASEAN Defense Ministers' Meeting-Plus Counter Terrorism Exercise supported by CCMR's Counter Terrorism Fellowship Program is now available at: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B6S3L...
  • Publication
    Beyond Micromanagement: Congressional Budgeting for a Post-Cold War Military
    (2005) Stockton, Paul; Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR)
    Critics of Congress often attack it for micromanaging the defense budget-that is, for dictating how much to spend on particular weapons and imposing other detailed requirements on the Department of Defense (DOD). Those critics urge Congress to shift its attention toward broader issues of U.S. military strategy, which for budgeting purposes concerns the size and overall characteristics that U.S. forces should have. However, as the old saying goes, beware of what you wish for; you might get it. Since 1990, key legislators have launched a barrage of proposals on defense strategy. This activism highlights the need to rethink how legislators link the details of the defense budget to broader policy concerns, and how the end of the cold war is affecting the mechanisms legislators use to shape defense spending.
  • Publication
    Management and Oversight of Intelligence Agencies
    (2014-06-04) Dombroski, Ken; Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs (NSA)
    To discuss the challenges of controlling the intelligence system in a democracy, and to highlight the dangers to democratic consolidation arising from the past intrusion of intelligence agencies into broad areas of the state and society.
  • Publication
    Center for Civil-Military Relations Brochure
    (Monterey, California, Naval Postgraduate School, 2014) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs; National Security Affairs (NSA)
    About the Center: Based at the US Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey CA, the Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR) was established in 1994 to assist newly emerging democracies in addressing the civil-military challenges of the post-Cold War world. In the two decades since its founding, CCMR has evolved to partner with a much broader range of regions and countries. Within the contemporary security environment, CCMR enables current US policies and strategies by offering a full spectrum of civil-military related programs.
  • Publication
    MET Operations and Planning Resources
    (2014-06-04) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs (NSA)
  • Publication
    Restart of defense reform efforts in Georgia
    (Monterey, California, Naval Postgraduate School, 2012-12-20) Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); Center for Civil-Military Relations; National Security Affairs (NSA)
  • Publication
    Legislatures and Defense: The Comparative Experience, Occasional Paper #8
    (2001-06) Giraldo, Jeanne Kinney; Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR); National Security Affairs; National Security Affairs (NSA)
    Democratically elected representatives in a country’s legislature have an important role to play in formulating defense and military policy and monitoring its implementation (i.e., oversight). Legislative participation in these areas is desirable for a number of reasons. Democracy as “rule by the people” is enhanced by input from all elected officials, not just those who comprise the executive branch. The needs of society and the military are more likely to be balanced to the extent that representatives from all segments of society are consulted in the policy process. Although consulting multiple actors in the Congress on defense issues may be time-consuming, the end result is usually better and longer lasting policy. The policy produced tends to be better as both the executive and military actors involved are forced to defend their positions publicly.