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dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Haflidi H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-11T18:47:49Z
dc.date.available2018-07-11T18:47:49Z
dc.date.issued2011-03-07
dc.identifier.otherOSTI ID: 1007799
dc.identifier.otherTRN:US201106%%174
dc.identifier.other1007799
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1007799
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/59148
dc.description.abstractThe Department of Energy conducted the Cloud-Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in Poncha City Oklahoma, in June 2007. The purpose of the experiment was to study the influence of different surface conditions on properties of small cumulus clouds. The Oklahoma site provided climatologically arid surface in the western part of the state, and lush green conditions in the eastern part. The summer of 2007, however, was exceptionally wet, with flooded fields and rivers flowing over their banks. This had seriously adverse effect on the experiment. CIRPAS participated in this with its instrumented Twin Otter aircraft, flight crew and scientist. The CIRPAS instruments measured temperature, dewpoint temperature, pressure, winds, aerosol particle concentrations, aerosol size distribution, cloud droplet concentration, cloud droplet size spectra, total scatter coefficients and absorption coefficients at three different wavelengths. Additionally, CIRPAS provided measurements of aircraft location, velocity and attitude. CIRPAS reduced all the data to engineering units, quality assured the data, and submitted a coherent data set to the project’s archive. The Twin Otter flew 15 sorties from the airport in Ponca City, and characterized meteorological, aerosol and cloud conditions as well as the temperature of the underlying surface in a wide variety of conditions. Conditions ranged from deep convection and thunderstorms, to totally clear sky and stable atmosphere. Some flights were coordinated with other aircraft, such as the DOE’s G-1, which was in Ponca City simultaneously doing the CHAPS mission, the NASA King Air, which used lidar to characterize underlying aerosol and clouds, and a helicopter from Duke University, which was characterizing turbulence. Other flights were coordinated with satellite overpasses, ground-based observation sites. The field campaign took place during the month of June, 2007, and all CIRPAS data had been delivered by October that same year.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOak Ridge Office
dc.publisherNaval Postgraduate School
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleFinal Report on NPS/CIRPAS support of DOE Classic Experimenten_US
dc.typeReporten_US
dc.contributor.corporateCIRPAS
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.subject.authorENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLOUDS; LAND RESOURCES; OKLAHOMA; INTERACTIONS; METEOROLOGY; MONITORING; meteorology, aerosol, clouds, radiation
dc.description.funderAI05-07OR23294


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